More quilters, and then…

 

More of the 46 Quilters featured in America’s Pictorial Quilts:

Carole Adams

Masami Kato

Mona Barker

Helen Kelly

Monica Calvert

Edward Larson

Linda Cantrell

Donna Rae Maki

Rhoda Cohen

Gwen Marston

Virginia Costa

Judy Mathieson

Pat Cox

Carole K. McMichael

Shannie Coyne

Jane Miller

Barbara Crane

Judith Montano

Joe Cunningham

Carolyn Muller

Alice Dunsdon

Anita Murphy

Ronnie Durrance

Paula Nadelstern

Ellie Dyson

Robbie O’Rourke

Chris Wolf Edmonds

Katie Pasquini

Victoria Faoro

Dawn Rappold

Lee Farrington

Art Salemme

Zoe Gill

Alice Schmude

Cathy Grafton

Joan Schulze

Marge Harris

Steve Schutt

Sarah Hass

Ami Simms

Roberta Horton

Elaine Sparlin

Lois K. Ide

Susan Turbak

Jean Johnson

Rhoda Cohen: Rhoda is still quilting and exhibiting on the east coast of the United States.  You can view her most recent work on her website.

Elaine Sparlin:  Elaine was such a talented quilter from Kansas who was widely known for her story quilts, but sadly she passed away in February of 2012.

Helen Kelley was inducted into the Quilter’s Hall of Fame on July 19, 2008, in Marion, IN.  Click on her name to see her speak after receiving her honor.  Helen’s information may be found on her site at http://www.helenkelley-patchworks.com/.  Helen passed away in September of 2008.

Steve Schutt was trained in the fine arts with a BA Degree in art education. For years he supplemented his teaching income making and selling quilts, woven baskets, intricately dyed Ukrainian eggs, detailed realistic gingerbread houses and performing and making puppets. He credits his maternal Grandmother for teaching him how to sew. Steve specializes in making teddy bears!

Linda Cantrell made her first quilt in 1977. She is a quilt show judge and teaches nationally.  I first fell in love with Linda’s quilts with her famous quilt “THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS,”  You can see it on her website if you click here.

Ami Simms: You’re not a real quilter if you don’t know who Ami Simms is! Ami is the gal behind the Alzheimer Art Quilt Initiative, and my first quilting buddy from way back in the early 1980’s.  Ami lives in Michigan, where she continues to make quilts and teach both in her home studio and all over the world.

“Beebe’s Orchids,” by Caron MoseyDsc03622

Made as an Alzheimer Art Quilt Initiative in honor of Beebe Moss, Ami’s mother,

who loved to grow the beautiful flowers in her home greenhouse.

Private collection.

America’s Pictorial Quilters, Continued even more

 

Here are more of the 46 Quilters featured in America’s Pictorial Quilts:

Carole Adams

Masami Kato

Mona Barker

Helen Kelly

Monica Calvert

Edward Larson

Linda Cantrell

Donna Rae Maki

Rhoda Cohen

Gwen Marston

Virginia Costa

Judy Mathieson

Pat Cox

Carole K. McMichael

Shannie Coyne

Jane Miller

Barbara Crane

Judith Montano

Joe Cunningham

Carolyn Muller

Alice Dunsdon

Anita Murphy

Ronnie Durrance

Paula Nadelstern

Ellie Dyson

Robbie O’Rourke

Chris Wolf Edmonds

Katie Pasquini

Victoria Faoro

Dawn Rappold

Lee Farrington

Art Salemme

Zoe Gill

Alice Schmude

Cathy Grafton

Joan Schulze

Marge Harris

Steve Schutt

Sarah Hass

Ami Simms

Roberta Horton

Elaine Sparlin

Lois K. Ide

Susan Turbak

Jean Johnson

Susan Turbak works at Earth Resources Laboratory and still quilts.  Her quilts have been exhibited all over the globe and one of them even traveled on the Challenger, during the 50th manned mission in space.

Joan Schulze works in mixed media and has been exhibited in numerous places.  Please visit her website to see all her work!

Victoria Faoro has written and served as an editor on numerous quilt books… see several of them listed here.  She was also the Founding Director of the Museum of the American Quilter’s Society.

Robbie O’Rourke is still active in designing pictorial quilts!  She served as the designer of the Newton commemorative quilt.

Mona Barker:  I couldn’t find very much about Mona on the Internet, but it does look like she was one of the contributors to the book Friendship Quilt by Golden Quilting Pattern Book 20 National Quilters.

Sarah Hass was an wonderfully accomplished quilter from the State of Iowa, a member of various art and quilting guilds, and won numerous awards for her quilting.  Sarah passed away on August 31, 2011. My sympathies go out to her family, and she will be greatly missed by the quilting community.

Dawn Rappold created a pretty quilt called  “LADY” 25.5 x 26.5″  in 1985. Beautifully hand-appliqued and hand-quilted.  I haven’t been able to locate anything more recent about her, however.  If you have any current information on Dawn, please leave a comment below.

America’s Pictorial Quilters, Continued

 

Here are more of the 46 Quilters featured in America’s Pictorial Quilts:

Carole Adams

Masami Kato

Mona Barker

Helen Kelly

Monica Calvert

Edward Larson

Linda Cantrell

Donna Rae Maki

Rhoda Cohen

Gwen Marston

Virginia Costa

Judy Mathieson

Pat Cox

Carole K. McMichael

Shannie Coyne

Jane Miller

Barbara Crane

Judith Montano

Joe Cunningham

Carolyn Muller

Alice Dunsdon

Anita Murphy

Ronnie Durrance

Paula Nadelstern

Ellie Dyson

Robbie O’Rourke

Chris Wolf Edmonds

Katie Pasquini

Victoria Faoro

Dawn Rappold

Lee Farrington

Art Salemme

Zoe Gill

Alice Schmude

Cathy Grafton

Joan Schulze

Marge Harris

Steve Schutt

Sarah Hass

Ami Simms

Roberta Horton

Elaine Sparlin

Lois K. Ide

Susan Turbak

Jean Johnson

Erma Martin Yost

Chris Wolf Edmonds: I have been a fan of her work for many, many years.  Chris, who lives in Kansas, has a resume that goes on and on and on.  Visit her website and gallery page, then click on photos of her quilts to see even MORE.  Wow!

Katie Pasquini Masopust:  Who doesn’t love Katie’s work?  I have watched her evolve over the years, and Katie is a very popular teacher.  From Santa Fe, New Mexico, Katie is both a painter and a quilter worth discovering. 

Monica Calvert: Monica was a part of Quilt Odyssey 2002.  Visit the website and watch a video with Monica to see what she’s done.

Roberta Horton: Roberta is both a traditional and contemporary quilter, author (C&T Publishing) and fabric designer.  Her work has been exhibited around the world, and she has taught in all but one of the United States. 

Erma Martin Yost: Erma is a very diverse artist, formally trained as a painter and now working in fiber (primarily felt).  Her work has been seen in many galleries around the country.  Plan to spend some time clicking around her website!  Gorgeous work!

Virginia Costa is from Los Banos, California.  I have found mention of her name in a few places, but discovered no website dedicated to her quilting.  If you know anything of her recent work, please let me know in the comment area below.

Anita Murphy:  You can read an older interview with Anita Murphy on the Alliance for American Quilts website. Anita was the author of a book on Mini Quilts and numerous other publications and patterns.  Sadly, Anita passed away in 2011 in Texas, her home state. 

 

**Note: clicking on a name will take you to a link elsewhere on the Internet for further exploration!

Stay tuned for more updates!

Where are they now?

AmericasPictorialQuiltsIn 1985, America’s Pictorial Quilts was published by the American Quilter’s Society.

At that time, pictorial quilts hadn’t reached the heights that they have today.  Pictorial quilts were more along the lines of having a folk appearance, or at the beginning of the movement into the pictorial art quilt.  They were more primitive than today’s work, to be sure.

From time to time I think about all the quilters whose work was featured in APQ, and wonder where they are… and what they are doing today.  Let’s take a look.  Over the next several posts, I will do some online searching to discover who is still creating quilts today, in hopes of sending you on a journey to investigate on your own.  If you recognize a name below and know about the quilter, please respond in the comment area at the bottom of this post.

The 46 Quilters featured in America’s Pictorial Quilts:

Carole Adams

Masami Kato

Mona Barker

Helen Kelly

Monica Calvert

Edward Larson

Linda Cantrell

Donna Rae Maki

Rhoda Cohen

Gwen Marston

Virginia Costa

Judy Mathieson

Pat Cox

Carole K. McMichael

Shannie Coyne

Jane Miller

Barbara Crane

Judith Montano

Joe Cunningham

Carolyn Muller

Alice Dunsdon

Anita Murphy

Ronnie Durrance

Paula Nadelstern

Ellie Dyson

Robbie O’Rourke

Chris Wolf Edmonds

Katie Pasquini

Victoria Faoro

Dawn Rappold

Lee Farrington

Art Salemme

Zoe Gill

Alice Schmude

Cathy Grafton

Joan Schulze

Marge Harris

Steve Schutt

Sarah Hass

Ami Simms

Roberta Horton

Elaine Sparlin

Lois K. Ide

Susan Turbak

Jean Johnson

Erma Martin Yost

Edward Larson:   Ed is a delightful character, still living and working in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  His website may be found at http://edlarson.com.

Gwen Marston:  Gwen is living and working on Beaver Island, off the coast of Northern Michigan.  The author of numerous books, she is preparing for her final Beaver Island Quilt Retreat. http://www.gwenmarston.com/

Paula Nadelstern: Paula has created so many beautiful quilts it’s hard to keep track of them all.  Take a look at her website and visit her gallery.  Be prepared to be amazed!  http://www.paulanadelstern.com

Joe Cunningham:  Joe’s quilting has stretched from very traditional hand quilting to some awesome and unique contemporary quilts.  http://www.joethequilter.com/  Joe will be visiting the Evening Star Quilters in April of this year to give a workshop and lecture.  For information, visit https://docs.google.com/open?id=0Byjbje_Gc82EUDV2YzFjQXNUNEE for the registration form.

Judy Mathieson: Judy has done a lot with pictorial quilts through the years, and also is drawn to the Mariner’s Compass design.  Now living in Sebastopol, California, Judy still quilts, teaches and lectures.  http://www.judymathieson.com

Cathy Grafton:  From Illinois, Cathy owns Prairie Quilts and More.  She loves quilting and silk ribbon embroidery, and her website is a delight.  Please check it out at http://www.prairiequiltsandmore.com.

Lois K. Ide:   Lois passed away Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at the age of 90.   A dear, sweet woman, her obituary included the following: Lois was well known locally and nationally in the quilt world through her published writings in several books, as well as through her lectures and workshops.  Her quilts have been shown in several museums including the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. and she has donated quilts to the Ohio Historical Museum in Columbus where they are still on display.  Following the publishing of America’s Pictorial Quilts, Lois sent four Christmas ornaments to me, which still hang on my Christmas tree every year. 

Judith Montano:Judith is a talented artist, and loves embroidery.  She has written several books, and her resume goes on and on.  See it for yourself on her website at http://www.judithbakermontano.com/.

Alice Schmude:  Alice created a beautiful quilt called “Michigan Wilderness.”  It is able to be seen on the Quilt index website here: http://www.quiltindex.org/basicdisplay.php?kid=1E-3D-118  If you know where Alice is, please leave a comment below.

Stay tuned for more updates!

Suggestions for making a quilt with an online quilt group

 

logoOn Feb 8, 2009, the Yahoo group “Yes We Can, Jane” was started by a few quilters who wanted to make a quilt for the newest President of the United States, Barack Obama. We are now nearing the end of our project, as the quilt will be completed within a few months when the hand quilting and binding are finished.  The project has been filled with a mixture of emotions, from elation, excitement, joy, friendship, creativity, frustration,  competition, and yes, anger.  There are probably some feelings I have left out, but all-in-all it has been a pleasurable undertaking.

I’ve been hand quilting for almost two days solid now, and as I let my fingers relax a little, I thought this might be a good time to provide you with a list of suggestions for any future online group endeavor, should you wish to create your OWN group quilt.

1. You will need, at a minimum, 2 moderators for the group.  The moderators will serve as leaders and organizers, setting guidelines and deadlines.  The moderators should be well-matched, as they will need to lean on each other for the duration of the project. They need not live in close proximity to each other; as ours was an online quilt group, we were connected by email, texts, etc.

2. Before you ever begin, set the timeline, rules and guidelines for the project.  While the timelines may be somewhat flexible in scope, the rules and guidelines must be iron-clad. 

3. A group quilt needs something to tie it together.  In our project, we were able to provide each individual quilter with a piece of fabric from the same cloth (see photo below).  Our ivory colored fabric was a donation from a generous individual; if you don’t have a donor, make sure you over estimate the amount of fabric you will need, and purchase accordingly. 

4. Since each quilter will probably use his or her own fabric to go with the background fabric to make their block, it is CRITICAL that all of their fabric be prewashed and checked for color fastness.  That should be RULE #1.

5. RULE #2 must state that upon mailing finished blocks to the “keeper of the blocks,” a 2.5 or 3 inch square of each of the fabrics used in the block be cut to the predetermined size and be mailed with the finished block.  These fabrics will then be used  by a member of the team to check for color fastness.  This is done by making a small patchwork quilt, alternating the background fabric with every single fabric that has been included in the quilt.  Once this small patchwork quilt has been sewn, it should then be tossed into a sink full of very hot water and left to soak for 30 minutes.  It is then rinsed, dried, and examined for any dye runs.   If any fabrics have not passed the color fastness test, any block with those fabrics should be eliminated without question or guilty feelings.  If any quilter does NOT include the sample swatches, their block should also be eliminated without question.

6.  Guidelines for quality control must be stipulated. Take time to think about what you want the finished quilt to look like.  What color theme?  What color style?  Traditional?  Contemporary?  Modern?  Civil War?  Pastel?

7.  Provide all quilters with the basics of applique and piecing.  Discuss thread type.  discuss size of stitching.  NOTE:  To eliminate this step is a major mistake, as every quilter on the planet has been taught different techniques or has been self-taught.  It is wise to discuss the kind of thread to use.  Thread used for hand quilting is NOT suitable for hand applique or for piecing. 

8.  Determine what jobs are needed for your project.  Who will sew the top together when your blocks are completed?  Who will receive the mailed blocks?  How will the quilt be quilted?  Who will quilt it?  Do the members of the group need to make afinancial contribution to assist with the quilting or the purchase of the background fabric?

9.  Make sure that each block arrives with the full name and address of the maker, their email address, and name of their block.  NOTE:  It is wise to stipulate that if any quilter does not wish his or her full  name to be used in public, this is not a project they should participate in.  It is too difficult to bend the rules for some and not for all, and it is hard to keep track of any variations. 

10.  Take a photo of each block as the envelopes are opened by the “keeper of the blocks.”  Each photo should then be assigned a number, and the name of the quilter and the block should go with each photo.

Example:

#28 Caron Mosey, Auto Industry.

AutoIndustry

11.  At all times, keep good communication with your group members.  Let them know what is going on, share the progress, discuss any issues or struggles, and let everyone have input.  Not everyone will agree 100 percent of the time.  Be prepared for that!  When your project is completed, have a celebration together.  In some way, you all need to celebrate your victory. 

A group project via an Internet quilting group is a fun activity that will bring quilters together from all walks of life and all parts of the globe.  Enjoy the process!

If you have participated in or organized an Internet quilt project, please leave a comment below and share your thoughts and suggestions on the process!  We’d love to hear from you!

It’s a Pineapple Quilt Day!

pineappleIf you’re  a hand quilter, you definitely need to go over to Tim’s blog and see his brand new Pineapple quilt!  The amount of hand quilting on it is astounding, and he has only worked on it since June. 

There’s a great binding tutorial on Stitched in Color that you also might want to check out.  It’s the method I use, except that I don’t zigzag the binding at the end.  I always sew the back side of the binding by hand.  But this method is great for doing miters.

If you are a regular reader of Michigan Quilts! you know that I have a day job that has nothing to do with fabric.  I took some time off this week for the birth of my grandson, Fischer.  Tuesday and Wednesday, I spent time at the hospital getting to know him, cuddling, holding, and all the wonderfulness that comes with a new baby.  This morning, I watched The Quilt Show’s episode with quilt artist and author Gyleen Fitzgerald, which was delightful! Gyleen showed us how she makes pieced pineapple quilts, and shows a great ruler for creating them.  I need to get her ruler, as that is one quilt I’ve thought about making. 

Towards the end of the show, Gyleenleslie_caron talked about how she got her name, which was very interesting and made me think about names.  I was adopted at four months old, and my mother loved the actress Leslie Caron, so she picked the name Caron as my first name.  Her best life-long friend, Alma Zivic, had a little girl whose middle name was Lee, so I was given the same middle name, leaving me as Caron Lee.

When I started high school, every student shared a locker with another person.  I imagine that the office staff had a fun time partnering people up for lockers, as I was assigned to a locker with a girl who was one year ahead of me.  Her name?  Caron Lee!  We are friends on Facebook, and continue to tease each other about our names to this day. 

sweetbabyMy grandson, Fischer also has a unique middle name.  Fischer Hayes Mosey takes his middle name from his Great Grandfather, Robert Hayes Covert.  Not only is it my father’s middle name, but it is also my brother’s, my nephew Brendan’s, and my grandpa Covert’s middle name.  The name goes back in the family as a last name to the late 1700’s, as Hayes was my Grandpa Covert’s grandmother’s last name.The name may go back farther, but that’s as far as we’ve been able to trace it.  It’s such a distinguished name: Fischer Hayes Mosey. I think he’ll be a president, CEO, or rocket scientist someday!

How did you get YOUR name?

Remember this name…

Lisa Burmann.

 

This is a name I know you’ll be seeing in the months and years ahead.  Lisa started quilting in 1987, learning by watching her grandmother quilt as she watched the Detroit Tigers ballgames.

She eventually took a beginning quilting community education class in Romeo, Michigan from a woman who was a hand quilter.  “We made our blocks by machine, and she encouraged us to hand quilt them.  I still have all those blocks, and I’m still trying to get that quilt done!  It was a Dutchman’s Puzzle pattern – luckily it didn’t dissuade me from quilting!  What a hard block to have a beginner learn!!!”

Lisa purchased a longarm machine in September, 2009 and took classes from Accomplish Quilting and Karen McTavish within the first few months ofr ownership. With help from longarm quilter Sandy Kipp and friends who entrusted her with their quilt tops, Lisa began her journey into longarm quilting.  Quilt designer Patsy Thompson recently asked Lisa to quilt a top for her, and the results are absolutely splendid!  Click on the photos to enlarge and see the fabulous details.  This is a beautiful pattern, and the quilting is executed so perfectly to set it off and echo the feather motif.

Dancing-Feath-Star-whole-quilt

Dancing-Feath-Star-side-shot-2

When Lisa isn’t quilting, she’s busy with her two sons, ages 6 and 16, and helping her husband with what she calls her “old money-pit farmhouse.” The house was moved to its current location from the town of Almont and we figure it’s about 150 years old.  The house and land hadn’t been maintained for over 20 years and there’s a lot to do!” 

Lisa said she’s “a workshop junkie and loves books and magazines.”  One of these days in the not too distant future, I’m sure you’ll see Lisa’s name in lots of books and magazines.  Mark my words!

Looking Backward… and Forward

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Caron Grandma Grandpa Covert

I happened to be at Dad’s house today and pulled out a photo album of old pictures.  This is lil’ me with my Grandma and Grandpa Covert.  I was two. 

Here I am at three, below.

Caron Dec 1959

 

 

I was an only child for almost nine years, so there are a lot of pictures of me when I was little. You know how it is… when you have more than one child, the camera doesn’t seem to get used as much. 

Caron June 1959

And then at around age 3.5.  I must have had an itch here! 

Here I am at age seven with Ginger, Grandma Ryan’s boxer. Caron Nov 1963 with Ginger She loved boxers, and had several.  They were all called Ginger.  She’d get a new dog when the old one passed away, and kept the name.  I always thought that was very strange.

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking the past 24 hours, what with the earthquake and tsunami in Japan and all.  It seems like the past several years have brought so many natural disasters around the world.  How do people who survive them cope?  A fellow quilt blogger in Japan, Tanya writes on her blog almost daily, and I’ve been watching for her updates frequently and praying for her and her husband and the people of Japan.  Her most recent post shows photos of the inside of her house after the quake.  How shocking!  Please stop by her blog and let her know you’re there. <=click here! 

I pray that those in Japan will heal in time.  May God’s blessings be upon them through their struggles.

angel

 

Lois K. Ide: Quiltmaker

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Sometimes people enter our lives, and we are all the better for it.   Lois Ide was such a person.  I “met” Lois when I was doing research for my first book, “America’s Pictorial Quilts.”  Lois was a talented quiltmaker from Ohio, and we carried on a penpal relationship about quilts, family and religion for many years.  I was sad to learn that Lois passed away recently just 10 days after her husband.

From her obituary:

Lois

“BUCYRUS: Lois K. Ide, 90, of Bucyrus, passed away Tuesday, November 30, 2010 at Altercare of Bucyrus.

Lois was born June 3, 1920 in Swanton (Fulton County), Ohio to the late William and Olive (Foote) Kyper. She married Carl J. Ide on June 12, 1943 at St. Luke Lutheran Church in Columbus.

In addition to her parents, Lois was preceded in death by her husband of 67 years, Dr. Carl J. Ide on November 20, 2010…

Lois was well known locally and nationally in the quilt world through her published writings in several books, as well as through her lectures and workshops. Her quilts have been shown in several museums including the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. and she has donated quilts to the Ohio Historical Museum in Columbus where they are still on display.
Lois enjoyed spending time with family and friends, and sharing her artistic abilities with others.”

When my family was preparing to move to a new house shortly after the book was published, we received a package in the mail from Lois.  She made each of us a Christmas ornament  – a Christmas goose – to hang on our tree, which we do every year. She wrote a little note on the back of her business care, which to this day I still have.

Lois2  Lois1  ornaments

Thank you for your friendship, Lois.

You can read more about Lois and her quilting in America’s Pictorial Quilts, published by American Quilter’s Society, copyright 1985, Caron L. Mosey, pages 23-24.

Goodbye, Vivian

The quilt world has lost a wonderful quilter. I will miss Vivian… her quilts were beautiful, and she was a sweet, delightful person. I remember fondly sharing numerous lunches at Vivian’s home. She was a great hostess, and a charming person.

From Mlive:

GOTTLIEB, Vivian Sosna – Of Brentwood, CA (formerly of Ann Arbor) passed away peacefully on November 8, 2009. Born August 20, 1930, Vivian was a gifted artist and poet, devoted wife, loving mother, dedicated homemaker, wonderful cook, and loyal and supportive friend to many. Vivian loved movies, reading The New Yorker magazine, collecting bride and groom figurines, and most of all, spending time with her family, sharing delicious meals, telling family stories and jokes, and enjoying the pleasure that her husband, children and grandchildren gave her. Vivian was born in Winnetka IL and graduated with honors with a BFA in painting from the University of Michigan in 1952. That fall she married Norman Gottlieb of Detroit and they moved to Flint MI upon his graduation from U-M Law School. They raised their family in Flint, where Vivian began a career in quilt and textile artistry. Her quilts won many awards and were featured in anthologies and shows across the country. She was active in the Flint Institute of Arts and served as a docent there. Vivian and Norman retired to Ann Arbor in 1992, where Vivian was active in the cultural community. She was a strong supporter of the U-M School of Music, Theatre and Dance and regularly enjoyed Ann Arbor’s many fine musical offerings. In recent years she and Norman relocated to southern California to be near their youngest grandchildren. She is survived by her husband, Norman Gottlieb; children Siri Gottlieb and Lisa Gottlieb (Jeff McCabe) of Ann Arbor; Mia Gottlieb (David Atkinson) of Tokyo, Japan; and son Sam Gottlieb (Rosalind Robinson) of Santa Monica CA; grandchildren Aaron Wilhelm (Alya Kashper Wilhelm) of New York City; Maisie Wilhelm of Denver CO; Zoey Clark and Nevon Clark of Ann Arbor; Evelyn Atkinson of Cambridge MA; Norah Atkinson of Seattle WA; Max Atkinson of Tokyo, Japan; and Nicholas Gottlieb and Chloe Gottlieb of Santa Monica CA. She was thrilled to welcome her first great-grandchild, Zina Wilhelm of New York City, into the world in October. Vivian and Norman recently celebrated their 57th wedding anniversary. Vivian was deeply loved by her family and friends, and will be profoundly missed. A private memorial for Vivian was held at a favorite spot of hers on the beach at Point Dume in Malibu CA.

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